Category Archives: Slaughtering

Backyard Chicken Slaughter Class

Chicken Slaughter Class in my Backyard

Evisceration

Developing Eggs from Eviscerated Chickens

Thanks to everyone in the Seattle Farm Co-op who participated in my backyard chicken slaughter class this morning! We had about 30 people, and processed around a dozen hens. A few people suggested we do this every year. Sounds like a tradition. Slaughtering can be difficult – not necessarily physically, but mentally – it’s something best done with friends.

For Meat Eaters Only

I have to share the most amazing book with you.

A copy of Philip Hasheider’s The Complete Book of Butchering, Smoking, Curing, and Sausage Making: How to Harvest Your Livestock & Wild Game appeared in my mail one day.

I set it aside and just recently cleaned up my computer area. There it was! Just when I needed it to break down rabbits from Abundant Acres Farm in time for our winter meal for the book this weekend. If you’ve never broken down a rabbit it’s not as intuitive as you might think it would be.

This book is amazing – it covers any big or small, backyard or wild game that you can imagine. The pictures are clear, the text is straightforward and there is nothing garish or squeamish about it.

I’ve attended classes on butchering before but it’s difficult to see everything up close. I feel like this book might be even BETTER than attending a class. You can spend as long looking at a particular cut as you like and the vantage point is as good as it possibly gets.

A lot of care has gone into making this book the next best thing to being there as possible, to honor the animals whose lives have been lost to eaters, and to providing recipes so that we might best honor those animals by ensuring no part of them is wasted.

And while I have no plans to start eating squirrels, possums and raccoons it’s nice to know how to process them. This book is so in depth that it covers frogs even.

I noted some differences in kill methods from what I believe to be the most humane or the simplest ones – namely the method for killing chickens was laying the chicken across a chopping block and cutting off the head while I prefer to hang the bird upside down and slit the throat (chickens are calm when upside down), and I prefer to dislocate a rabbit’s neck over stunning and bleeding them.

But as the saying goes – there is more than one way to skin a cat. Thankfully cats and dogs are not in this book.

If processing your own meat is one of those things on your life list I can heartily recommend this book.

Please note that the Amazon link in this entry is an affiliate link. They don’t amount to much but they do help defray my hosting costs.